Read Forgotten Families: Ending the Growing Crisis Confronting Children and Working Parents in the Global Economy by Jody Heymann Online

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In the last half-century, radical changes have rippled through the workplace and the home from Boston to Bombay. In the face of rapid globalization, these changes affect us all, and we can no longer confine ourselves to addressing working and social conditions within our own borders without simultaneously addressing them on a global scale. Based on over a thousand in-depthIn the last half-century, radical changes have rippled through the workplace and the home from Boston to Bombay. In the face of rapid globalization, these changes affect us all, and we can no longer confine ourselves to addressing working and social conditions within our own borders without simultaneously addressing them on a global scale. Based on over a thousand in-depth interviews and survey data from more than 55,000 families spanning five continents, Forgotten Families is the first truly global account of how the changing conditions of work threaten children, women and men, and the infirm. It addresses problems faced by working families in industrialized and developing countries alike, touching on issues of child health and development, barriers to parents getting and keeping jobs, problems families confront daily and in times of crisis, and the roles of growing inequalities. Rich in individual stories and deeply human, Heymann's book proposes innovative and imaginative ideas for solving the problems of the truly belabored together as a global community....

Title : Forgotten Families: Ending the Growing Crisis Confronting Children and Working Parents in the Global Economy
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780195156591
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 306 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Forgotten Families: Ending the Growing Crisis Confronting Children and Working Parents in the Global Economy Reviews

  • Stephanie Bostic
    2018-11-05 12:49

    Heyman pulls together a solid and easily read mixture of statistics, case studies, and expert interviews to create a narrative that crosses the globe and challenges assumptions. Solving the issue will be complex, but one that our societies need to consider seriously as the future health and potential of our societies rests on our abilities to support the growth and development of the next generation.I found the subject was enlightening. As I don't have children, or a specific interest in overall child health, I had never contemplated what the impacts of childcare options are on future populations. Simple situations, such as young children being unable to cook food for themselves and having greatly increased risks of malnutrition and stunting just becuase there were not responsible adults available, are easily overlooked and concerning. The conclusions are intuitive, but also easily ignored.

  • Stephanie
    2018-10-18 13:07

    This is the back-story of what childcare and family experience looks like for low income workers in developing countries. From AIDS in Africa (many orphaned children) and the myth that grandma is caring for the kids - this book reveals that children are carrying the weight of sweatshop labor with their parents. When grandparents are poor, they are in the labor force as well. Childcare may look like enlisting the town drunk, or locking a child in a home with a wood-fire based heat system while mom/parents are away at work. This book peels removes any romanticism about the labor system. That being said, I was left with the impression that the next book is more solution-oriented. For an academic topic, there is a good balance of engaging writing, stories, and a ton of data.

  • Teresa
    2018-10-21 05:04

    This is a great book about globalization and its effect on the developing world, specifically how neoliberalism has created systemic poverty on a huge scale. Heymann and her researchers did an amazing study of families in 180 countries combining qualitative and quantitative work in such a way that it's impossible to not be swayed by her arguments. It's accessible, well-written, and organized too, which makes the book even more impressive.

  • Kathy
    2018-10-20 13:15

    An easy-to-read book about why basic working benefits like paid maternity leave, paid sick leave, and paid time off are essential to lifting families out of the cycle of poverty. The book simply and clearly describes the problems that currently face working families and then sets out possible and workable solutions...