Read Sent for You Yesterday by John Edgar Wideman Online

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Reimagining the black neighborhood of his youth Homewood, Pittsburgh -Wideman creates a dazzling and evocative milieu. From the wild and uninhibited 1920s to the narcotized 1970s, "he establishes a mythological and symbolic link between character and landscape, language and plot, that in the hands of a less visionary writer might be little more than stale sociology" (New YReimagining the black neighborhood of his youth Homewood, Pittsburgh -Wideman creates a dazzling and evocative milieu. From the wild and uninhibited 1920s to the narcotized 1970s, "he establishes a mythological and symbolic link between character and landscape, language and plot, that in the hands of a less visionary writer might be little more than stale sociology" (New York Times Book Review)....

Title : Sent for You Yesterday
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780395877296
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 208 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Sent for You Yesterday Reviews

  • Deb
    2018-11-16 05:43

    This is a beautifully written novel and the final book in Wideman's Homewood Trilogy. I read it without having read the others (Damballah and Hiding Place); it can stand alone, if you don't yet have the others. That said, I plan to hunt the other books down and read the entire set. The most outstanding feature of this book is the fluidity of point-of-view: Doot narrates in first person, it might slide into Carl's internal point-of-view, or maybe it's third person and close to Lucy. This and the time shifts are a challange only for so long as it takes the reader to discover that the echoes in characters' lives, particularly between Albert Wilkes and Brother, suggest that others' lives live in all of the characters in Homewood, and, by extension, in us. The voice is lovely and modulates, depending on who's point of view is telling the section.If you have enjoyed Faulkner's layers of thought in Light and August or Morrison's dextrous shifts in point of view in The Bluest Eye or Sula, you'll most definitely enjoy Sent for You Yesterday.

  • Stoiph
    2018-11-18 05:38

    This book is amazing. like, "how do people get these things in their heads??" style of writing. Just the way he describes and links things...And, it was like The Known World in a way where Wideman could make certain commentary through an unconventional situation with Brother Tate and his being an albino and what that meant to his community and family. It was hard to follow at first but once i got the hang of it, I could appreciate it so much more. Though, I did have to re-read a lot of paragraphs still. Anyway, excited to read the others in the Homewood series. I think this was my favorite novel we had to read for this lit class.

  • Hank Horse
    2018-11-19 06:35

    Years ago in Inman Square there was a bookstore called House of Sarah. I liked it because the cheap mass market paperback wall was well stocked with literary titles, so if you were broke you could still pick up something good to read. I often will read the first page of something to see if I really want to spend some time with the book. SFYY begins with a prologue where two characters in heaven talk about a dream. I read it, thought 'hmm,' and as I was putting it back on the shelf, froze because I suddenly *got* the historical event to which the dream indirectly refers. It was like some interior alarm bell saying 'Middle Passage' went off, and this brief bit of fiction brought it home to me deeply. Fine writing.

  • Pat
    2018-12-01 09:21

    I really enjoyed this book, even though some parts of it seemed to drag on. The writing style was quite different as there were no " for dialog and often it was unclear who was speaking unless I paid close attention to context.

  • Jessica
    2018-11-22 11:28

    Didn't move me as much as I wanted it to--probably because the prose is so abstract, almost poetry. Still, lovely use of language and a compelling structure...

  • Patrick
    2018-12-12 05:26

    An excellent novel. This story is the first novel in the Homewood Series. Homewood is the ghetto of Pittsburgh. It's about three friends growning up in Homewood. Contains some great characters: Brother, an albino black kid, and John French

  • Danielle
    2018-12-05 04:43

    Very meditative, takes concentration to read.

  • julia
    2018-12-07 08:37

    This was a quick read, with beautiful prose, but I couldn't connect to the story or it's characters.

  • Hannah Langhoff
    2018-11-15 05:38

    Slow-moving but poignant, and Wideman's prose is beautiful.

  • Elizabeth
    2018-11-19 12:22

    A challenging read. I should have a go at it again. Takes place in Pittsburgh.

  • Clinton Parks
    2018-11-25 08:30

    I've never read anything like this. the closest is Edward P. Jones. It's all description and dialogue. perspective and tone. beautiful and surreal yet down home.

  • Patrick Duane
    2018-11-15 06:32

    This book made me cry three or four times.

  • Dale
    2018-11-22 08:44

    01.30.2017: based on 01.29.2017 NYT Magazine article on this author; book #2 of the Homewood Trilogy; all only at Berea College Library...

  • Andrew
    2018-11-15 07:24

    sublime magical realism. so good.

  • Carrie
    2018-11-22 08:45

    Fall 2000 Bryant