Read Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America by Tina Rosenberg Online

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An honest judge in Medellin, a Maoist guerilla of Peru's Shining Path, the fair-haired Angel of Death in Argentina's Dirty War, the pool-party rich of El Salvador, the disabused revolutionaries of Nicaragua, and the ordinary Chileans who became silent partners in Pinochet's dictatorship—these people live in Latin America, but their stories illuminate the human face of violAn honest judge in Medellin, a Maoist guerilla of Peru's Shining Path, the fair-haired Angel of Death in Argentina's Dirty War, the pool-party rich of El Salvador, the disabused revolutionaries of Nicaragua, and the ordinary Chileans who became silent partners in Pinochet's dictatorship—these people live in Latin America, but their stories illuminate the human face of violence all over the world.Tina Rosenberg spent five years trying to understand their world and learning to live with these "children of Cain." Their stories are disturbing precisely because these people are not monsters; the faces in Children of Cain are not those of strangers....

Title : Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780140172546
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 400 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America Reviews

  • Gregory Schultz
    2018-12-10 19:51

    When you read this book, you'll get a better understanding why many Latin America countries are called third-world countries. There was one point I thought I was reading a duplicate paragraph; it turns out it was a different country.Tina Rosenberg is a great author who lived in the countries she wrote about and experiences the daily electrical outages, water shortage, daily gun battles, million percent inflation, governments overthrown, etc. The above were almost daily occurrences. This wasn't an author that interview people from think tanks; the people interviewed in the book were living in that country and describe what life is like in these countries.And, be warmed, if your squeminish about torture, this book iss not for you.

  • Alejandro Ramirez
    2018-11-11 17:04

    Sobre la violencia en Latinoamérica, se eriza el pelo de cómo en Colombia el narco es aceptado, el abogado que intenta perseguirlo es visto como un paria. Mas inquietante la dictadura militar argentina, la tortura incluso a los neonatos, las esposas de los torturados, acaban casandose y paseando por europa con los torturadores. La Chilena que niega los casos de tortura hasta que alguien le recuerda un caso, y ella recuerda que es su hermana, lo habia olvidado, bloqueado? De la memoria. La infame oligarquia en Salvador y Bicaragua, el apoyo norteamericano, la paradoja de políticas economicas capitalistas en un pais castigado por sus valores socialistas.

  • Martin Streetman
    2018-11-24 22:10

    This book was really fascinating but depressing. It was broken into 6 parts each about a different country. What I took away from it was that regardless of how much the USG spent down there that it hasn’t changed much and when the US looses interest or the money stops flowing things go back to the way they have always been."plata o plomo" A choice in Columbia, silver or lead, a bribe or a bullet."Few Revolutions create the just and free societies they seek to create. But at least they produce a few fleeting hours of hope"This is another in a pile of books that I am attempting to finish. The bookmark shows me picking it up in August of 2003.

  • Aldean
    2018-11-28 18:09

    I know I didn't get all the way through this book, but that was in no way a negative reflection upon the merits of this fine peice of extended journalism. (Only a negative reflection on my atention span as a reader.) What I did read was intense, well-researched and very well-written, a look into a world of violent inequities. Each chapter focuses on a different nation in Latin America with some representative narrative, examining events and characters, usually with the author tracking down and interviewing key players from past headlines. Almost definitely I book I will be picking up again someday to finish

  • Manish Sapkota
    2018-12-04 16:11

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this fascinating account of Latin America in the 70s and 80s. The author uses many real life characters to illustrate diversity in the mindset of people and how different segments of the society viewed political system back then. She does an incredible job to make sense of things happening from historical point of view. The present day Latin American societies tend to bear similar characteristics as illustrated in the book back in the 70s and 80s. This speaks volumes of how true the author has been to her work.

  • Rafael Gonzalez
    2018-11-19 18:08

    Tina Rosenberg travels to Latin America when violence is the norm and as a pulitzer-winning journalist, her style alone is compelling. She throws herself into Colombia, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador and Peru when bureaucratic authoritarianism and violent military regimes are waging war on their own citizens and reports, with thick, flowing, gut-wrenching tales of what it was like to live as a repressed and violated citizen.

  • Andre
    2018-11-27 14:10

    This book shows just a fraction of the violence that takes place in South America, but it intentionally steers clear of making it just a show of who is more violent or how incredible the carnage of American backed regimes could be, but focuses on how they came to such a state and the process to getting there.

  • Cat Browne
    2018-12-10 14:03

    A lot of this book was very hard to read as it describes the methods of torture employed by different regimes in south and central america. As a portrait of modern day warfare, and the inhumanities that the human race subject each other to it was fascinating

  • Suzanne
    2018-11-20 19:16

    Perhaps one of the most disturbing parts of a disturbing book is that reading about Chile in the early 80s didn't sound far enough from what it's like over here more recently. Too much of it was just too similar.

  • Jake Berlin
    2018-12-08 13:48

    a compelling look at latin america in the 1980s. rosenberg makes incredibly complex situations understandable through clear prose and accessible through personal stories.

  • Jeff
    2018-12-01 22:18

    One of the first books I read to better understand Latin America, and still one of the best.

  • mauricio garcia
    2018-11-09 16:03

    a bit one-sided, but insightful nonetheless.

  • Joan
    2018-11-11 20:54

    don't know how to delete this. i never read this. maybe i will

  • D
    2018-11-23 16:59

    Great look at violence in south america

  • Fatima Jinnah
    2018-12-01 18:52

    This book describes a lot of violence so you really have to know that before you begin. I had to mentally prepare to read the book.

  • Remi
    2018-12-04 15:07

    What you read in newspapers or history books mean shit unless you read this. Amazing, violent, hopeful and worrisome all rolled into one.

  • Russ
    2018-11-17 20:50

    Tina Rosenberg gives good insight into how politics have played out in South America, and perhaps gives a warning to those in the United States how apathy can lead to dictatorship.