Read Chinese America: The Untold Story of America's Oldest New Community by Peter Kwong Dusanka Miscevic Online

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From award-winning author Peter Kwong and Dušanka Mišcevic comes a definitive portrait of Chinese Americans, one of the oldest immigrant groups and fastest-growing communities in the United States. Beginning with stories of Chinese frontiersmen who came to the West Coast by the thousands in the mid-nineteenth century and continuing to the high-tech transnationals who haveFrom award-winning author Peter Kwong and Dušanka Mišcevic comes a definitive portrait of Chinese Americans, one of the oldest immigrant groups and fastest-growing communities in the United States. Beginning with stories of Chinese frontiersmen who came to the West Coast by the thousands in the mid-nineteenth century and continuing to the high-tech transnationals who have helped spark the development of today’s booming Chinese American “ethnoburbs,” this engrossing narrative recounts stories of extraordinary hardship, discrimination, and success.Chinese America is a landmark analysis that draws on firsthand reporting in Asia and the U.S. Offering a new picture of the country’s development, Kwong and Miscevic provide the first comprehensive report on the suburban immigrant communities that are transforming America. Urban ghettos continue to host some of the country’s poorest immigrants, but Chinese Americans now live in the suburbs in similar proportions to whites—and have brought with them Chinese supermarket chains, language schools, and growing clout in America and Asia. Exploring the burgeoning trade—and underlying conflicts—between China and the U.S., Chinese America reveals the complex connections between immigration, globalization, and foreign policy in our time....

Title : Chinese America: The Untold Story of America's Oldest New Community
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781595581198
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 518 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Chinese America: The Untold Story of America's Oldest New Community Reviews

  • Mary
    2019-03-18 09:38

    CHINESE AMERICA: The Untold Story of America's Oldest New Community - Peter Kwong and Dusanka MiscevicYears ago I was traveling across the US with a couple of visiting scholars from China. We stopped for the night in Mitchell, a small town in South Dakota and looked around for someplace to eat dinner, when Bing spotted a Chinese restaurant. "Let's eat there," he said. I tried to dissuade him, knowing that a Chinese restaurant in the middle of South Dakota was a LONG way from Beijing and probably known locally for its "excellent" chop suey. But he insisted. So in we went. Sure enough, the menu was filled with chop sueys, chow meins, and subgums - nothing recognizable to a real Chinese. But when the waitress came, Bing asked to see the owner. And when the owner came, Bing spoke to him in Cantonese. And to my great surprise, fabulous Chinese dishes, probably unknown to the fine citizens of Mitchell, began arriving at our table. The owner eventually joined us and we learned a bit of his family story. His great grandfather had come to build the railroad in the 1860's, he said, and when the railroad was finished , because of the incredible racial strife increasingly suffered by Chinese workers, he faced two choices - go to live in the safety of one of the Chinese ghettos (aka Chinatowns) in one of the big cities in America or find some little place where nobody would bother with him because he was, after all, just one lone Chinese and not a "yellow horde" -- where he could offer something (laundry help) that the community otherwise wouldn't have. Eventually the family, now in its fourth generation, owned a laundry mat, a dry cleaners, and little this restaurant. It was a common dilemma faced over and over again by Chinese who came to the United States, some legally, some as conscripted laborers for a term, many illegally, some at the invitation of the American government or colleges and universities - almost all of them were vulnerable and unprotected by rule of law or citizens rights until the 1940's - and, in fact, quite the opposite, subject repeatedly to the worst kinds of oppression and violence this country can heap on "foreigners who don't look like us." The story is extensively chronicled in this very thorough history of the Chinese in America which looks at each generation of Chinese who form the American part of the diaspora known in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong as "overseas Chinese." The particulars of what brought them here vary greatly depending on when they came and why, but the challenges are amazingly the same -- how to deal with the racism which has kept them separate and always under suspicion and still maintain an identity and a culture which is true to who they are - Chinese and American.I appreciated this book for many reasons. First, it covers the whole panorama -- from start (Chinese merchants in the 1830's who came to California because it was cheaper and faster to get goods from China than across the US before the opening of the transcontinental railroad (1869) and the Panama Canal (1914) through the whole era after the Chinese Exclusion Act and its subsequent additions (1882ff), to finish, the post-modern creation of ethnoburbs, housing the most recent Chinese immigrants, those providing imported technical and scientific knowledge, from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and mainland China. Secondly, it chronicles and celebrates the creativity of generations of people who found themselves victimized by racism and yet seeking to thrive despite all that mitigated against them, including, often, their own country and countrymen on both sides of the Pacific. Thirdly, the authors spend nearly a third of the book on an exploration of the story of Chinese Americans and Chinese in America since 1949 - a very complex and fascinating discussion which probes the depths of modern and post-modern politics, religion, economics, and sociology. The fact is that more Chinese arrive every day still, legally and illegally, and still face the same dilemma the restaurant owner in Mitchell, South Dakota identified to us not all that long ago. (11/21/12)

  • Regina
    2019-03-14 10:41

    This story contains one of the oldest immigrant groups the, Chinese, and the fastest growing communities in the United States. Beginning with stories of Chinese frontiersmen who came to the West Coast by the thousands in the mid-nineteenth century and continuing to the high tech transnationals who have helped spark the development of today’s booming Chinese Americans prosperity. These compelling narrative recounts stories of the immigrant's struggles, extraordinary/ endured hardships, discrimination, and their success.

  • Patti
    2019-02-26 15:51

    Oh man, this book is killing me. It's interesting/boring, if you know what I mean. The information in it is interesting, but it reads like a history text. It feels a little like Pepto Bismol. It doesn't taste *that* awful, but it still feels like medicine. I'm kind of reading it because I feel like I should.

  • Jordan Brown
    2019-03-13 13:44

    A good cultural and political history of 19th and 20th century China and America through the lens of Chinese immigrants. A bit repetitive at parts, but that also means you can read select chapters rather than all the way through.

  • Marina Koerber
    2019-03-03 14:37

    This book has to be a must for every Chinese and for everyone who would like to understand this part of American history.