Read A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism by Colin Baker Online

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Written in a very reader-friendly style, the book is a practical introduction for parents and teachers to bilingualism. Straightforward and realistic answers are given to a comprehensive set of frequently asked questions about bilingualism and bilingual education. Areas covered include family, language, culture, identity, reading, writing, schooling and issues.In the thirdWritten in a very reader-friendly style, the book is a practical introduction for parents and teachers to bilingualism. Straightforward and realistic answers are given to a comprehensive set of frequently asked questions about bilingualism and bilingual education. Areas covered include family, language, culture, identity, reading, writing, schooling and issues.In the third edition, there is new or more detailed consideration of:Moving between countries, cultural adaptationIdentity issuesOne parent - one language (OPOL) familiesPre schools / kindergartens / nursery schoolsHelping with homeworkDyslexiaLanguage scaffoldingMultilingualism and trilingualism; trilingual familiesAdoptionWWW links, articles and books for further reading...

Title : A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781847690005
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism Reviews

  • Nadine
    2018-10-30 03:43

    I understand the rationale of having the book structured as a Q&A but in doing so some of the strength of the message gets lost / diluted. The truth is that true bilingualism takes a lot of effort - and much of that needs to occur in the primary years and the hard bits are the literacy - especially writing. Further it takes a clear understanding of Jos to set your goals and plan to achieve them.You need to do a lot of reading around the book to get that.

  • Wendel
    2018-11-13 00:09

    This book mainly addresses the question whether or not children from 'third-world' immigrants should first learn to speak and read their parents language. The text is not particularly helpful for parents in a mixed marriage, interested, like me, in raising their children bilingual from a very early ageIt is clear that raising a bilingual child needs a strategy and special attention must be given to the weaker language (weaker in influence in a given situation). Therefore, the author argues, children of minorities should first learn their parents language.Teaching the majority language must not start before primary school. No pre-school activities in the majority language. Reading should first be learned in the minority language, secondary schools must also use the minority language. This strategy is thought to serve both the interests of the child and those of traditional cultures.Colin Baker is, I believe, an authority in his field, but I'm afraid his argument failed to convince me. That has a lot to do with the radicalism with which it is presented. Not a single counterargument is taken seriously and the author has some weird opinions outside his field of competence (e.g. racism as a speciality of the west, the idea that language never was a factor in the outbreak of war, monolinguists as muggles). I also find it very difficult to embrace his implicit ideal of multicultural segregation (the Lebanon model).Finally, my appreciation of this book was lessened by the author's inhibition to call problems by their name, which made the reading unnecessary difficult, and the repetious style, which made it a bit boring.

  • Theresia
    2018-10-22 03:52

    Three examples of teaching strategies that can be used by parents1. develop a 'sight' vocabulary first2. get your child to talk about an experience. one or more short sentences (or later, a story) is written down on a card. A copy of the sentence is cut up and reconstructed by the child3. children are given a story (esp. to do with their own experience or something from their parent's past) with words missing. They are asked to guess the missing words and write them in the text. This encourages comprehension and reading independence.

  • Sandra
    2018-10-31 04:04

    The book is structured in questions and answers so it's quite easy to browse to the topics that actually apply to your family situation. The sections about family and development are useful for any language combination at home but I felt that the sections about education were very focused on situations in which English is one of the languages at home or in the society, thus it was quite useless for us.

  • Judit Gueta
    2018-11-02 23:00

    The writer repeats himself a lot, and for relatively special cases as ours (my mother tongue is a minority language with almost no other speakers around, and my husband does not speak it) there isn't too much practical information after the first (two) chapters. Those two chapters are pretty good though.

  • GONZA
    2018-10-27 04:49

    It is always better to read this book again because Tommaso is growing up and we are considering whether to send him to a bilingual school.È sempre meglio ripassare considerando che Tommaso sta crescendo e stiamo valutando se mandarlo ad una scuola bilingue.

  • Estelle
    2018-10-29 21:07

    I registered a book at BookCrossing.com!http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/14128908

  • Cait Webster
    2018-10-22 01:04

    Nice overall

  • ABC
    2018-10-27 21:49

    Good intro to multilingualism.

  • Susanna
    2018-10-23 04:10

    think I ordered this from amazon.fr last year