Read To Throw Away Unopened by Viv Albertine Online

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What was I fighting for? Even now I'm not sure. Something so old and so deep, it has no words, no shape, no logic. Every memoir is a battle between reality and invention - but in her follow up to Clothes, Music, Boys, Viv Albertine has reinvented the genre with her unflinching honesty.To Throw Away Unopened is a fearless dissection of one woman's obsession with the truthWhat was I fighting for? Even now I'm not sure. Something so old and so deep, it has no words, no shape, no logic.Every memoir is a battle between reality and invention - but in her follow up to Clothes, Music, Boys, Viv Albertine has reinvented the genre with her unflinching honesty.To Throw Away Unopened is a fearless dissection of one woman's obsession with the truth - the truth about family, power, and her identity as a rebel and outsider. It is a gaping wound of a book, both an exercise in blood-letting and psychological archaeology, excavating what lies beneath: the fear, the loneliness, the anger. It is a brutal expose of human dysfunctionality, the impossibility of true intimacy, and the damage wrought upon us by secrets and revelations, siblings and parents.Yet it is also a testament to how we can rebuild ourselves and come to face the world again. It is a portrait of the love stories that constitute a life, often bringing as much pain as joy. With the inimitable blend of humour, vulnerability, and intelligence that makes Viv Albertine one of our finest authors working today, To Throw Away Unopened smashes through layers of propriety and leads us into a new place of savage self-discovery....

Title : To Throw Away Unopened
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780571326235
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 407 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

To Throw Away Unopened Reviews

  • Squirrel Circus
    2019-01-23 10:01

    I received this book from the LibraryThing Early Reviewers group in exchange for an honest review. When I started this memoir, I had no idea who Viv Albertine was (not a spoiler, she was a founding member of the female punk group The Slits). One of the first great things about this memoir is that you DON'T have to know Albertine, the memoir reveals universal truths. If you do know of her, this memoir sheds some light on how she may have been emotionally primed for the emerging punk scene. What I really like about the structure of this book is that there are short, bold print sections that relate only to one very important evening in the author's life. That ONE evening unfolds over the entire physical length of the memoir, broken up by much longer narrative sections that include important vignettes from the authors childhood, young adult life, married life, life as a single mom. It takes SO long for the action of that ONE evening to be fully revealed, that it creates that sense of how some moments in your life occur as if in slow motion; while, how you react to the moment is informed by every other experience in your life to that point. I hope I described that in a way that makes sense. It's a very effective and suspenseful technique!Albertine explores what happens when you realize that the motivation behind your family members' behavior isn't what you had believed it to be.....

  • Lisa
    2019-02-16 08:03

    This was interesting—much darker than her last, which had a basically positive message (about re-creating yourself artistically and personally as a middle-aged woman). This starts out full of righteous female anger, very much of its time—not #metoo so much as #allofus. But the second half gets heavy. Albertine has the opportunity to read both her parents' diaries after their deaths, chronicling their angry and abusive relationship before their divorce—a chance most of us should feel fortunate we don't get. Albertine progresses through and processes several layers of realization as she reads, especially when it comes to her mother—the central figure in her life besides her daughter—who was always a source of strength but, as Albertine comes to understand, a wellspring of great dysfunction, and for good reason. This kind of Rashomon-on-the-couch could be oppressive, but Albertine's voice is so great—profane, funny, literate, and self-deprecating—it elevates the book into an interesting study of what happens when we uncover family secrets, and how to consider them in light of being a fully-formed (or as much as anyone can ever be, which is actually a parallel theme) adult. Not a light read, but interesting and—I'm guessing for many—relatable.